AGING OF ACCOUNTS Definition

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AGING OF ACCOUNTS is the classification of accounts by the time elapsed after the date of billing or the due date. The longer a customers account remains uncollected or the longer inventory is held, the greater is its realization risk. If a customers account is past due, the company also has an Opportunity Cost of funds tied-up in the receivable that could be invested elsewhere for a return. An aging schedule of accounts receivable may break down receivables from 1-30 days, 31-60 days, 61-90 days, and over 90 days. With regard to inventory, if it is held too long, obsolescence, spoilage, and technological problems may result. Aging can be done for other accounts such as fixed assets and accounts payable. See also ACCOUNT AGING.

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INCOME THEORIES try to identify the real profit of an organization. The difficulty here is that you need to define whose income you are measuring, and that limiting income measurements to things that can be given a price devalues goods and services that are difficult or impossible to price.

PREMISE OF VALUE is an assumption regarding the most likely set of transactional circumstances that may be applicable to the subject valuation; e.g. going concern, liquidation.

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