BANKER'S ACCEPTANCE Definition

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BANKER'S ACCEPTANCE (BA) is a money market instrument that is issued in discounted form. A banker's acceptance is created when a bank accepts responsibility for payment of business debt by signing a letter of credit. Banker's acceptances are sold to acceptance dealers and may be resold to numerous other parties before the loan is repaid. The investor who last owns the acceptance when the debt becomes due has a right to collect from the borrower. Should the borrower default, the investor can also pursue payment from the accepting bank.

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PISCAN DOCUMENT, a precursor of double entry bookkeeping, dates from the early 12th century. Records indicate that primitive bookkeeping with sequential transactions using Roman numerals was presented in paragraph form. Some of the record fragments are from an unknown Florentine banking firm dated from 1211. It was not yet double entry bookkeeping, but advancing in that direction. Other fragments include the Castra Gualfred and the Borghesia Company from 1259-67; Gentile de Sassetti and Sons, 1274-1310; and Bene Bencivenni, 1277-96. The most complete records are from Rinieri Fini & Brothers, 1296-1305, and Giovanni Farolfi & Co., 1299-1300.

MARGIN CALL (Stocks) is a demand for additional funds because of adverse price movement is a stock.

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