BOOK ENTRY TRANSACTION Definition

Bookmark and Share

BOOK ENTRY TRANSACTION, in securities, is a transaction that does not entail physical transfer of paper securities. An entry is made on the books of a safekeeping depository showing the beneficial owner of the securities. This has become a standard transaction method for all U.S. Treasury, many U.S. Government agency securities and many tax­able and tax-exempt instruments.

Learn new Accounting Terms

COMMON SIZED PERCENTAGES are financial statements in which each item is expressed as a percentage of a major financial statement component. In the Income Statement, each "Common Size %" is the field amount expressed as a percent of "Net Revenues." In the Balance Sheet, each "Common Size %" is the amount in the category as a percent of Total Assets. Common sized financial statements can be used to: a. identify key structural changes in a company's financial data over a period of time; b. more easily compare the financial data of firms that vary significantly in size; and, c. compare a company's financial data to industry norms.

FLOATING RATE CONVERTIBLE NOTE (FRCN) is a debt instrument that is a short-term debt obligation where the interest rate is variable because it is linked to a market rate such as the 3-month T-bill rate or London Interbank Offer Rate (LIBOR), and conditionally allows for the note to be exercised into the security of the debtor in accordance with the conditions set forth in the debt instrument.

Suggest a Term

Enter Search Term

Enter a term, then click the entry you would like to view.