BOOK-TO-BILL RATIO Definition

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BOOK-TO-BILL RATIO is the ratio of orders taken (sic booked) to products shipped and bills sent (sic billed). The ratio is a measure of whether a company has more, equal to or less than the orders than it can likely produce and deliver. The book-to-bill ratio is primarily of interest to investors or traders in the high-tech sector.

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STOCK DIVIDEND is a dividend paid in stock rather than in cash. The additional shares can be in the form of a stock split, additional shares of the issuing company, or of a subsidiary.

CAPITALIZED is when something is recorded as an asset. For example, a capitalized lease is in substance a purchase to the lessee. An asset is recorded equal to the present value of the lease payments, which is also recorded as a liability. Payments, partly interest and partly principal, are made on the lease liability. The leased asset is depreciated by the lessee as though it were legally owned by the lessee.

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