COMMON SIZED PERCENTAGES Definition

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COMMON SIZED PERCENTAGES are financial statements in which each item is expressed as a percentage of a major financial statement component. In the Income Statement, each "Common Size %" is the field amount expressed as a percent of "Net Revenues." In the Balance Sheet, each "Common Size %" is the amount in the category as a percent of Total Assets. Common sized financial statements can be used to: a. identify key structural changes in a company's financial data over a period of time; b. more easily compare the financial data of firms that vary significantly in size; and, c. compare a company's financial data to industry norms.

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TWO PARTY ENDORSEMENT, normally, is when two signatures are required to make a document or bank draft legal or authorized.

CURRENT RATIO, a comparison of current assets to current liabilities, is a commonly used measure of short-run solvency, i.e., the immediate ability of a firm to pay its current debts as they come due. Current Ratio is particularly important to a company thinking of borrowing money or getting credit from their suppliers. Potential creditors use this ratio to measure a companys liquidity or ability to pay off short-term debts. Though acceptable ratios may vary from industry to industry below 1.00 is not atypical for high quality companies with easy access to capital markets to finance unexpected cash requirements. Smaller companies, however, should have higher current ratios to meet unexpected cash requirements. The rule of thumb Current Ratio for small companies is 2:1, indicating the need for a level of safety in the ability to cover unforeseen cash needs from current assets. Current Ratio is best compared to the industry. Formula: Current Assets / Current Liabilities

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