COMPETITIVE PRICING Definition

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COMPETITIVE PRICING generally is where firms must be able to offer the best price in the market and meet price erosion without compromising quality. This is normally met whenever a firm finds acceptable a prices-production combination such that: a. At these prices, there is no other production plan yielding higher profits and using fewer capital goods; namely, firms behave as constrained profit maximizers at given prices; and, b. There is no price vector satisfying "a." with higher prices for capital goods. In other words, the prices of capital goods are maximal within those satisfying constrained profit maximization

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KIKIN, in Japan, is a capital foundation fund.

KEEP-WELL AGREEMENTS, also known as comfort letters, are documents from one party written to another party in regards to contingent liability. Comfort letters have been held by courts to be legally enforceable commitments if they meet certain standards criteria of language. Comfort letters meeting these standards are loss contingencies in that they are construed to guarantee a financial commitment and must be reported under Statement of Financial Accounting Standard 5 as a guarantee. Auditors should review the language of all comfort letters and seek to discover contingent liabilities not disclosed in financial statements in situations where comfort letters exist. Sources of information concerning the contingent liabilities of comfort letters include: management and third parties. Auditors should document within the client representations letter management assurances that loss contingencies have been reported.

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