CONTINGENT LIABILITY Definition

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CONTINGENT LIABILITY is: (a) A possible obligation from past events that will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the enterprise; or (b) A present obligation from past events but is not recognized because (i) it is not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation; or (ii) the obligation cannot be measured reliably. Some examples: in corporate reports are pending lawsuits, judgments under appeal, disputed claims, and the like, representing potential financial liability.

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IN-THE-MONEY OPTION is an expression used for any option series with intrinsic value, i.e., the options strike (exercise) price and market price of the underlying security are such that the holder can exercise the option at a profit. For example, if a call option with a strike price of 30 and the underlying stocks market price is currently 33, the call is in the money. A put option is considered in the money when the underlying stock is selling below the strike price. Premiums and other transaction costs are not considered in determining whether the option is in the money or out of the money. See OUT-OF-THE-MONEY OPTION.

CREDIT RECORD (CR) is an entry in a double-entry bookkeeping system recording an increase in a liability; an owners equity item or revenue; or a decrease in an asset or an expense. Credit entries are conventionally made on the right-hand side of T accounts.

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