DERIVATIVE CONTRACT Definition

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DERIVATIVE CONTRACT is, generally, a financial contract the value of which is derived from the values of one or more underlying assets, reference rates, or indices of asset values, or credit-related events. Derivative contracts include interest rate, foreign exchange rate, equity, precious metals, commodity, and credit contracts, and any other instruments that pose similar risks. See DERIVATIVE.

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COUPON BOND pays the holder of the bond a fixed interest payment (a coupon payment) every year until the bond reaches maturity. It is named a coupon payment, because a bondholder had to obtain their interest payment by clipping a coupon off of a bond and send it to the bond issuer, the bond issuer then sent the bondholder the payment. This process is no longer necessary for most coupon bonds. Examples of coupon bonds: Treasury bonds, Treasury notes and corporate bonds.

DEPRECIATION RESERVE in the process of allocating the cost of a fixed asset over its effective service life in a systematic and rational manner (depreciation schedule), the value of each depreciable asset is reduced by its depreciation amount. To match this, the depreciation amounts are added to a "depreciation reserve" in the long-term liabilities.

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