DOUBLE-ENTRY ACCOUNTING Definition

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DOUBLE-ENTRY ACCOUNTING is a system of recording transactions in a way that maintains the equality of the accounting equation. The accounting technique records each transaction as both a credit and a debit. Double-entry bookkeeping (DEB) or accounting was developed during the fifteenth century and was first recorded in 1494 as a system by the Italian mathematician Luca Pacioli.

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BACK-TO-BACK TRADING allows securities dealers to trade and settle the same securities several times during the same settlement day without loss of value days.

ACCOUNTING EQUATION is a mathematical expression used to describe the relationship between the assets, liabilities and owners equity of the business model. The basic accounting equation states that assets equal liabilities and owners equity, but can be modified by operations applied to both sides of the equation, e.g., assets minus liabilities equal owners equity.

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