LIABILITY, in insurance Definition

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LIABILITY, in insurance, is a term used when analyzing insurance risks that describes possible areas of financial exposure / loss. Presently, there are three forms of liability coverage that insurers will underwrite: The first is general liability, which covers any kind of bodily injury to non-employees except that caused by automobiles and professional malpractice. The second is product liability, which covers injury to customers arising as a direct result of goods purchased from a business. The third is public liability, which covers injury to the public while they are on the premises of the insured.

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PAPER is: a. amount received, by a seller of real estate, in the form of a mortgage or note rather than cash; b. a short-term debt security; c. customer buy and sell orders coming to a trading pit; d. money market instruments, commercial paper.

LABOR INTENSIVE is used to describe industries or sectors of the economy that relies relatively heavily on inputs of labor, usually relative to capital but sometimes to human capital or skilled labor, compared to other industries or sectors.

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