LIABILITY, in insurance Definition

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LIABILITY, in insurance, is a term used when analyzing insurance risks that describes possible areas of financial exposure / loss. Presently, there are three forms of liability coverage that insurers will underwrite: The first is general liability, which covers any kind of bodily injury to non-employees except that caused by automobiles and professional malpractice. The second is product liability, which covers injury to customers arising as a direct result of goods purchased from a business. The third is public liability, which covers injury to the public while they are on the premises of the insured.

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RULES-BASED ACCOUNTING is where specific accounting rules are set forth and must be followed in order to comply with GAAP. For example, if an airline company leases a jet, the company must follow specific GAAP rules to determine if the transaction is an operating lease or a capital lease. The main difference being that a capital lease would have to appear on the balance sheet of the airline. Therefore, two virtually identical lease transactions could be classified entirely differently based upon how they follow the GAAP leasing rules. See also PRINCIPLES-BASED ACCOUNTING.

COMMITTED FIXED COST: See COMMITTED COSTS

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