LIQUIDATION VALUE Definition

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LIQUIDATION VALUE is a type of valuation similar to an adjusted book value analysis. Liquidation value is different than book value in that it uses the value of the assets at liquidation, which is often less than market and sometimes book. Liabilities are deducted from the liquidation value of the assets to determine the liquidation value of the business. Liquidation value can be used to determine the bare bottom benchmark value of a business, since this should be the funds the business may bring upon valuation. Liquidation can be either "orderly" or "forced".

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TAG-ALONG RIGHTS is a contractual obligation used to protect a minority shareholder (usually in a venture capital deal). Basically, if a majority shareholder sells their stake, then the minority shareholder has the right to join the transaction and sell their minority stake in the company. Also referred to as co-sale rights.

SOFT CLOSE, in accounting, is when journal entries may be allowed to periods previously considered closed with the confidence that you can create corrected financial statements and that balances brought forward are corrected; in securities, is when a fund will no longer accept new investors into the fund, however existing shareholders can continue to contribute.

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