LONG-TERM DEBT TO EQUITY Definition

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LONG-TERM DEBT TO EQUITY expresses the relationship between long-term capital contributions of creditors as related to that contributed by owners (investors). As opposed to DEBT TO EQUITY, Long-Term Debt to Equity expresses the degree of protection provided by the owners for the long-term creditors. A company with a high long-term debt to equity is considered to be highly leveraged. But, generally, companies are considered to carry comfortable amounts of debt at ratios of 0.35 to 0.50, or $0.35 to $0.50 of debt to every $1.00 of book value (shareholders equity). These could be considered to be well-managed companies with a low debt exposure. It is best to compare the ratio with industry averages. Formula: Total Long-Term Liabilities / Stockholders Equity

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FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FNMA) is a private corporation chartered by the U.S. Government to provide mortgage money for home buyers. FNMA buys mortgages from lenders and sells mortgages to investors. FNMA guarantees the timely payment of both interest and principal. Also known as "Fannie Mae".

CEBS is Certified Employee Benefit Specialist, Committee of European Banking Supervisors, or Capital Equipment Budget System.

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