LONG-TERM DEBT TO EQUITY Definition

Bookmark and Share

LONG-TERM DEBT TO EQUITY expresses the relationship between long-term capital contributions of creditors as related to that contributed by owners (investors). As opposed to DEBT TO EQUITY, Long-Term Debt to Equity expresses the degree of protection provided by the owners for the long-term creditors. A company with a high long-term debt to equity is considered to be highly leveraged. But, generally, companies are considered to carry comfortable amounts of debt at ratios of 0.35 to 0.50, or $0.35 to $0.50 of debt to every $1.00 of book value (shareholders equity). These could be considered to be well-managed companies with a low debt exposure. It is best to compare the ratio with industry averages. Formula: Total Long-Term Liabilities / Stockholders Equity

Learn new Accounting Terms

SEGREGATION OF DUTIES means assigning different people the responsibilities of authorizing transactions, recording transactions, and maintaining custody of assets. Segregation of duties reduces the opportunities for one person to both perpetrate and conceal errors or fraud.

4 Cs OF CREDIT are the four primary considerations that will affect a lenders decision to approve or decline your loan application. Known as the 4 C's of credit:

  1. Capacity - what is your ability to repay the loan? Do you have a job or another income source? Do you have other debts?
  2. Character - will you repay the loan? Have you used credit before? Do you pay your bills on time?
  3. Collateral - if you fail to repay your loan, is there something of value that you agree to forfeit? For example, if you are buying your first car, it could be used as collateral to insure that you will repay the loan. If you default, you lose your car.
  4. Capital (accumulation) - what are you worth? Do you have other assets, such as a savings account, car, or certificate of deposit that could be used to repay the debt?

Suggest a Term

Enter Search Term

Enter a term, then click the entry you would like to view.