MONEY SUPPLY Definition

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MONEY SUPPLY is the three categories of money supply (MI, M2, M3) as defined by the U.S. Federal Reserve Board.

M1 The sum of-currency held by the public, plus travelers' checks, plus demand deposits, plus other checkable deposits-i.e., negotiable order of with­drawal (NOW) accounts, automatic transfer service (ATS) accounts and credit union share drafts.

M2 MI plus savings accounts and small-denomina­tion time deposits, plus shares in money market mutual funds (other than those restricted to institu­tional investors) and overnight Eurodollars and repurchase agreements.

M3 M2 plus large-denomination time deposits (over $100,000) at all depository institutions, large­-denomination term repurchase agreements and shares in money market mutual funds restricted to institutional investors.

Learn new Accounting Terms

NET INTEREST MARGIN is the interest income earned on assets less interest expense paid on liabilities and capital. NET INTEREST MARGIN is the gross margin for financial institutions.

DOOMSDAY RATIO is related to the quick (acid test) ratio in that it is a conservative approach to debt coverage. The doomsday ratio only considers the cash on hand when evaluating if an entity can cover their current liabilities. The approach is that if the business were to go bankrupt today, would the business have enough cash on hand to cover current debts. The ratio is considered a good indicator of the cash cushion of safety. It may spot cash shortages, thereby assisting in avoiding a credit crisis. It is calculated: Cash divided by Current Liabilities.

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