MONEY SUPPLY Definition

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MONEY SUPPLY is the three categories of money supply (MI, M2, M3) as defined by the U.S. Federal Reserve Board.

M1 The sum of-currency held by the public, plus travelers' checks, plus demand deposits, plus other checkable deposits-i.e., negotiable order of with­drawal (NOW) accounts, automatic transfer service (ATS) accounts and credit union share drafts.

M2 MI plus savings accounts and small-denomina­tion time deposits, plus shares in money market mutual funds (other than those restricted to institu­tional investors) and overnight Eurodollars and repurchase agreements.

M3 M2 plus large-denomination time deposits (over $100,000) at all depository institutions, large­-denomination term repurchase agreements and shares in money market mutual funds restricted to institutional investors.

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ACCOUNTING THEORY tries to describe the role of accounting and is composed of four types of accounting theory: classical inductive theories, income theories, decision usefulness theories, and information economics / agency theories: a. Classical inductive theories are attempts to find the principles on which current accounting processes are based; b. Income theories try to identify the real profit of an organization; c. Decision usefulness theories attempt to describe accounting as a process of providing the relevant information to the relevant decision makers; and, d. The information economics / agency theories of accounting see accounting information as a good to be traded between rational agents each acting in their own self-interest.

SLIT is Serial-Lot Item Tracking.

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