NET PROFIT MARGIN (NPM After Tax) Definition

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NET PROFIT MARGIN (NPM After Tax) measures profitability as a percentage of revenues after consideration of all revenue and expense, including interest expenses, non-operating items, and income taxes. For a business to be viable in the long term profits must be generated; making the net profit margin ratio one of the key performance indicators for any business. It is important to analyze the ratio over time. A variation in the ratio from year-to-year may be due to abnormal conditions or expenses which need to be addressed. A decline in the ratio over time may indicate a margin squeeze suggesting that productivity improvements may need to be initiated. In some cases, the costs of such improvements may lead to a further drop in the ratio or even losses before increased profitability is achieved. Generally, if the NPM history is >20% annually, it is an indicator that the firm enjoys a sustainable competitive advantage. If the average NPM is <10%, it usually indicates that the firm is in a highly competitive business. Formula: Net Profit After Tax (EAT + DII + OI) / Net Revenue

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PERIODIC VALUATION allows for the determination on future dates the value of assets, portfolios, etc. with the idea of setting a new standard cost or value to those assets. Such revaluations, up or down, are then posted as the new standard cost or value. See REVALUATION.

SHORT SALE is the selling of a security that the seller does not own, or any sale that is completed by the delivery of a security borrowed by the seller. Such sales are made in anticipation of a decline in the price of the security to enable the seller to cover the sale with a purchase at a later date, at a lower price, and thus at a profit. Short sellers assume the risk that they will be able to buy the stock at a more favorable price than the price at which they sold short.

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