POOLING OF INTEREST METHOD Definition

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POOLING OF INTEREST METHOD is an accounting method for reporting acquisitions accomplished through the use of equity. The combined assets of the merged entity are consolidated using book value, as opposed to the PURCHASE METHOD, which uses market value. The merging entities` financial results are combined as though the two entities have always been a single entity. See POOLING-OF-INTERESTS.

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MEDIUM TERM ASSETS, usually, are those assets that are expected of having a useful life of between six months and two years of the present.

PRESENT VALUE is the discounted value of a payment or stream of payments to be received in the future, taking into consideration a specific interest or discount rate. Present Value represents a series of future cash flows expressed in todays dollars. A given amount of money is almost always more valuable sooner than later, so present values are generally smaller than corresponding future values.

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