TIMES INTEREST EARNED Definition

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TIMES INTEREST EARNED (TIE) measures the extent to which operating income can decline before the firm is unable to meet its annual interest costs. The TIE ratio is used by bankers to assess a firm's ability to pay their liabilities. TIE determines how many times during the year the company has earned the annual interest costs associated with servicing its debt. Normally, a banker will be looking for a TIE ratio to be 2.0 or greater, showing that a business is earning the interest charges two or more times each year. A value of 1.0 or less suggests that the firm is not earning sufficient amounts to cover interest charges.  Formula: Earnings Before Interest & Taxes [EBIT] / Interest Charges

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COLLATERALIZED MORTGAGE OBLIGATION (CMO) or, since 1986, as a Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC). CMOs and REMICs (terms which are often used interchangeably) are similar types of securities which allow cash flows to be directed so that different classes of securities with different maturities and coupons can be created. They may be collateralized by mortgage loans as well as securitized pools of loans.

BENEFIT PERIOD is the projected useful life time period over which an asset will be productive.

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