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TIMES INTEREST EARNED (TIE) measures the extent to which operating income can decline before the firm is unable to meet its annual interest costs. The TIE ratio is used by bankers to assess a firm's ability to pay their liabilities. TIE determines how many times during the year the company has earned the annual interest costs associated with servicing its debt. Normally, a banker will be looking for a TIE ratio to be 2.0 or greater, showing that a business is earning the interest charges two or more times each year. A value of 1.0 or less suggests that the firm is not earning sufficient amounts to cover interest charges.  Formula: Earnings Before Interest & Taxes [EBIT] / Interest Charges

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ROLLOVER is: a. in U.S. real estate tax law, a delayed tax that allows you to apply the profit you make selling your old house to pay for the new one without paying capital gains taxes on the profit. In order to rollover the profits, the new house must be more expensive than the old and the two sales must occur within two years of each other; b. in investments, it is the transferring of funds from one investment to another such as rolling over the proceeds from a bond which has matured into another bond, or the rolling over of the proceeds of a share sale into a tax-efficient investment vehicle like a Venture Capital Trust; or, c. in banking, it is the term used when a borrower obtains authority from a bank to delay a principal payment on a loan.

COLLECTION PAPERS are those documents specified as necessary for payment to be made, such as the commercial invoice, certificate of inspection, and bill of lading.

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